Watching your weight? Why home cooking is probably the best option.

If you eat out a lot then maybe it’s time to pick-up a new hobby like cooking. According to the John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health research people who eat more at home, tend to eat healthier and consume fewer calories than people who prefer to eat out more. The research also mentioned that those that cooked more at home tended to consume fewer calories when they ate out.
The researchers did a study of over 9,000 participants over the age of 20. The survey asked what the participants age in a period of over 24 hours as well as how much fast food they had eaten in the past 30 days. The people that managed to eat out more ate up to 300 more calories, fat and sugar on an average day. If one thinks about 300 calories more, every day begins to add up pretty quickly. That’s not even factoring in how much more sugar and fat the people that eat out more are taking in.
I know this is a challenge for a lot of people since they work more than over 35 hours a week, but just look at the math. If 3,500 calories adds up to an extra pound added to your weight, then eating out every day would potentially cause someone to gain 1 pound over 12 days. In a little over a month that would translate into almost 3 pounds or roughly 30 extra pounds to your weight in a year. I know I am probably making this a lot simpler than it is. Many of us will jump on a weigh machine and freak out when we have gained over 10 pounds, and attempt to do something about it then and there. My point to all this is why allow it to reach this point even? If we maintain our lifestyle more effectively before we arrive at the point of all that weight gain. Just something to think about when it comes to managing your weight. If you need some help with coming up with a plan to more effectively manage your diet or health, please do not hesitate to give my office a call for an appointment.

Dr. Shah, MD

Sources:

Is cooking at home associated with better diet quality or weight-loss intention? http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25399031 (accessed November 19, 2014).