Does Lifestyle Counseling Cut the risk of Heart Disease

According to an article published by medpagetoday.com, overweight or obese adults who have additional cardiovascular disease risk factors should have behavior counseling to promote a healthy diet and physical activity. This is according to the USPSTF or the U.S. Preventative Services Task Force (if you really wanted to know that).
I have been preaching this for many years now. In standard medicine, we keep on pushing pills and giving patients handouts to read. This would make a lot of senses if it were that easy to understand what to eat and what not eat and also how to cook the things you should eat. Oh and there is also how much exercise a particular individual should be doing? What about handling stress? Wait, let’s get you a handout on how to handle anger management. That’S not good enough? Here another handout on how to quit smoking.
Do you see my point? The way the patient is counseled about their heart disease isn’t going to help them overcome it. An integrative approach attempts to work with the patient and makes sure they understand the things they need to do to help them overcome their heart disease. That is why I decided to adopt an integrative approach, and this is the method I use with all my heart patients. It’s about educating the patient on diet, exercise and stress management. It’s also about helping my patients feel good about where they are in their life and where they are going. I know it sounds like an immense goal, but if a patient wants to get better, he or she can in many cases getting a lot healthier.

Dr. Shah, MD